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20120930
20121008
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KQED (PBS) 20
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. tonight we look ahead to technology that could be in our future. an update on europe and its ongoing financial crisis. e.u. officials say the region's economy shrunk more than expected in the second quarter. year-to-year the eurozone economy contracted by nearly 1%, that's almost twice as much as what was calculated last month. but the e.u.'s statistics agency says the revision could be due to the region's economy being stronger than thought a year ago. the revision isn't expected to change policymakers' decisions regarding stimulus and bailout efforts. >> susie: even as more americans find work, there are still 12 million people searching for jobs and many workers are discovering they need new skills to land one. you only have to go as far as your local goodwill for some job training services. just last year, more than 3.5 million people reached out to goodwill industries international for help with job training and placement. sylvia hall continues our look at job retraining. when you think of goodwill, you may think of a store like this. what you may not know is that the money made
government's role in infrastructure, in science and technology, would take us so far away from what we need, i wish president obama had the revenues to do more, but it is the republican side that is blocking that because that party has one idea only. and that is to cut taxes for the rich. we have this multi-brazilian there running for office. his money is in the cayman island. he pays 13% in taxes. he says the most important thing is to cut the tax rates at the top for the. it is mind-boggling that we have this kind of blatant candidacy. people are hurting, people are upset. that is why this weirdness even has a choice. but it would take as exactly in the wrong direction. president obama could have done more and would have done more if the republican opposition had not blocked the end of the bush era tax cuts for the rich, for example. so romney is in quite a position to be blaming president obama for that when it is exactly this side that has made the kind of recovery we need so fleeting and evanescent. we need a strong recovery, but the policies he is recommending would be the opposite of
on an accurate and reliable system of vote counting. despite continued advances in voting technology, zero there are security issues still persist, barbara simons is an expert on electronic voting and on the advisor of the election commission and her book is called broken ballots will your votes counties, welcome. >> thank you very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get involved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we di
: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost four points. and, as suzanne pratt reports there are conflicting views on the state of american manufacturing. >> reporter: from cardboard boxmakers, to icemakers, to uniform manufacturers, factories across t
a challenge turning this huge user base into an equally huge profit. our technology correspondent has more. >> it is the place ever more people go to share every detail of their lives and today's big event is that now has more and a billion users. >> there is no way would where getting starting with says that i would never thought that myself or any of the people brought it would be able to be part of the black this. it is incredible. >> the student idea turned into a giant global business. this office packed with sales staff and engineers sometimes used in conventional means to get around. facebook is a young company, keen to preserve a zany upstart image. but now life is getting that the series. it needs to go on conquering new territories and prove it can make more and more money per from its growing audience. in some countries, it is hard to see where the growth will come. in the u.k., more than half the population is on. in north america, 45% use it. in africa, only 5% have signed up and in asia, only 7% of the population are users. in india, that is changing rapidly. people are typic
missile technologies rohr aspiring to get missle technologies, some of them with a range to hit population centers in europe. so we want to protect our population against that real threat. >> rose: an attack on any nato country an attack on all nato countries? >> exactly. that is stated that we consider an attack on one ally an attack on all. and on september 12, 2001, we invoked that famous article for the first time in the history of our alliance. we considered the terrorist attacks on the united states an attack on the whole alliance and actually that's the reason why we are in afghanistan today. >> rose: where do we stand now? u.s. withdrawal is scheduled to end by 2014. what's the schedule for nato countries if it differs? >> it's the same. we have outlined a clear road map for a gradual handover of responsibility to the afghan security forces. that's a nato and i.s.a.f. decision. we have 50 countries in our i.s.a.f. coalition. 28 nato allies and 22 partners. and we have agreed on a road map according to which we will gradually hand over lead responsibility to the afghans. they will t
its stock, falling to a new 52-week low. volume was more than ten times normal. medical technology firm nuvasive also warned its third quarter revenue will be disappointing. the stock fell 32.9%. nuvasive makes implants and devices for spinal surgeries. it said it lost customers to competitors. mimicking what we saw in the broader market, the financial sector e.t.f. saw the biggest gains among the five most actively traded exchange traded products. it was up 1.5%. four of the five most actively traded products were stronger. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: all this week, we have been highlighting the need for job retraining. today, we look at a slightly different problem facing many high-tech start-ups. in spite of the weak economy, there are many firms that cannot fill positions. erika miller went to one soho building where firms gripe they can't hire as fast as they want. >> i've been working here for 221 hours. >> reporter: keith blanchard is one of the newest hires at thrillist, a media company targeting young, hip, urban men. three million subscribers get a dail
. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? what can we do for you?
gets to sit there for a lot of time and a lot of money and a lot of technology and a lot of focus on exactly who the voters are. i don't mean abstractly who are the voters, i mean literally who the voters are, who those people are, you got to go to their doors and get them out of the house to go. >> that's a critically important point and one having troubled with george w. bush in 2000-2004 and going to places along the gold coast or the red neck riveria whatever you want to call it in florida where there are new areas of republican voters, we would fly somewhere or go on a bus for two hours and say why are we here and carl row will say republican registration is this and we'll pump it up to this. dave talks about florida. if we can get 59% hispanic votes or over 60 there's no way romney can win the state of florida if we tweaked the hispanic vote to that number. these successful campaigns are doing exactly what johns talking about. they know exactly where their voters are, they know how to dial up certain demographic groups to tweak the final number in that state. the obama team
provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the first presidential debate is behind them, but the two sides went at it again today. republicans said their man took it to the president in the denver duel. the obama camp charged the truth got trampled in the process. >> la night i thought was a great opportunity for the american people to see two very different visions for the country. and -- (applause) -- and i think it was helpful to be able to describe those visions. i said the president's vision is trickle-down government and i don't think that's what america believes in. i see instead a prosperity that comes through freedom. >> reporter: romney's reception at the event was reinforced by instant polling that he won last night's encounter
more by a long shot. we need to spend more on technology if we want to be competitive in the world. >> why didn't we do this in the smulus program that was enacted? >> i think we should have done more. i think the -- >> was it a commit political compromise that prevented the stimulus program being what might have met your approval. >> it was partly a political compromise. i think it was partly a misdiagnosis. >> even though republicans didn't vote for it. >> that's right. but it was partly a misdiagnosis that we were going to be facing a short-term problem and what i just described are long-term things. and they wanted to focus on things that be would short term fillers. their model was the financial sector was sick. you put it in the hospital. for a year and a half or two, then it recovers. and the economy goes on as it was before. >> even though my impression was that history has told us that it takes longer to recover from a financial recession than a recession that comes from main street. >> that's right. and i think that's only one of the failures that they made in the diagnos
is let's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain our technological lead and our people are skilled and able to succeed. and hard-pressed states right now can't all do that. in fact, we've seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years, and governor romney doesn't think we need more teachers. i do. because i think that, that is the kind of investment where the federal government can help. they can't do it all, but it can make a difference and as a consequence, we'll have a better trained workforce, and that will create jobs because companies want to locate in place where's we've got a skilled workforce. >> lehrer: two minutes, governor, on the role of government, your view. >> first, i love great schools. in massachusetts, ow schools are ranked number one of all 50 states. and the key to great schools, great teachers. so i reject the idea that i don't believe in great teach erpz or more teachers. everyone school descrirkt every state should make that decision on their own. the role of government. look behind us. the constitut
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)